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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Risk construction at a public hearing: an application of socio-cultural theories into organizational risk

Topal, Cagri Unknown Date
No description available.
2

Making Success a Self-Plying Piano : A Study on How Management Can Influence Risk-Culture

Sjöholm, Emma, Uusitalo, Oliver January 2022 (has links)
A common misconception is that the safest strategy when dealing with risk is to avoid it altogether, resulting in mainly risk hedging strategies aligned with a downside biased view of risk, only focusing on outcomes with a negative effect causing missed opportunities (Damodaran, 2007). Furthermore, another common misconception is the effort to quantify risk, to measure and prioritize it. However, Knight (1921) disregards such an effort due to a lack of guidance in the ever-changing business environment. For an organization to maintain its competitive advantage, it is important to create a risk culture that is neither too defensive, nor too offensive, since it can cause even worse outcomes (Damodaran, 2007). This study takes a qualitative approach, where interviews has been conducted on a single company, which is referred to as “target organization. These interviews will be representing the empirical data for the study. With surprisingly little research done on the subject of risk culture, this thesis aims to identify key managerial tools and concepts to reinforce or change their organizational risk culture. These tools were identified as communication, learning through failure, double-loop learning, incentives, and structure. Furthermore, the study has exemplified concrete measures regarding these tools to align managerial efforts to either hierarchal or adhocracy risk culture.
3

Pursuing Enterprise Risk Management: A Local Roadmap for Canadian Health Care Leaders

Haney, James 19 July 2012 (has links)
An in-depth analysis of organizational risk management in health care, and in particular the concepts of Enterprise Risk Management (ERM), has identified a five part model that can be used by Canadian health care leaders as an evidence supported approach to successful organizational risk management. The Model for Organizational Risk Management has been developed as a basis for linking the components of an ERM framework into a Canadian health organization in order to overcome the barriers that commonly disrupt strategic risk management. The Model addresses how an ERM framework can fit within an existing health organization by building off of and enhancing existing processes and resources in order to ensure familiarity, acceptance, and sustainability of the risk management program. By approaching the Model in a stepwise fashion (based on individual organizational context) health care leaders are provided with a roadmap from which to advance their own organizational risk management program.
4

Pursuing Enterprise Risk Management: A Local Roadmap for Canadian Health Care Leaders

Haney, James 19 July 2012 (has links)
An in-depth analysis of organizational risk management in health care, and in particular the concepts of Enterprise Risk Management (ERM), has identified a five part model that can be used by Canadian health care leaders as an evidence supported approach to successful organizational risk management. The Model for Organizational Risk Management has been developed as a basis for linking the components of an ERM framework into a Canadian health organization in order to overcome the barriers that commonly disrupt strategic risk management. The Model addresses how an ERM framework can fit within an existing health organization by building off of and enhancing existing processes and resources in order to ensure familiarity, acceptance, and sustainability of the risk management program. By approaching the Model in a stepwise fashion (based on individual organizational context) health care leaders are provided with a roadmap from which to advance their own organizational risk management program.

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