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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

"How do we create together?" Urban food commons as gateway to ecological intelligence

Kemshaw, Matthew 19 November 2013 (has links)
This study emerged from the author's work in a food commons in industrial East Vancouver. It began from a curiosity about how place impacts who we are. By employing a process oriented research design the study evolved to ask: How may participation in the Purple Thistle's food commons influence people's engagement in the urban landscape? The findings challenge modern notions of property and urban design, and highlight a vision of the urban impossible (Chatterton, 2009) that could catalyze communities to uphold their democratic right to the city. Entering through an open, process oriented, and trust centered organizational structure, participants' experiences in the Purple Thistle garden led them to new ways of experiencing (in)dependence and trust. This had implications for the way they saw the world around them, and the way they engaged in the built environment.
2

Urban poor and the right to the city

Kolbovskaja, Oksana January 2016 (has links)
No description available.
3

Transforming neighborhoods, changing communities : collective agency and rights in a new era of urban redevelopment in Washington, DC

Howell, Kathryn Leigh 17 February 2014 (has links)
As the demand for center city living in the US has grown, housing has been used to revitalize neighborhoods and contribute to the tax base of the city. I investigate the ways that change, fostered and shaped in part by federal and local housing and planning policies, affects low income neighborhoods undergoing redevelopment at the level of “community.” To study these issues I study the Washington, DC neighborhoods of Columbia Heights: In less than ten years, this neighborhood was transformed by planning and housing policies from a primarily low-income, isolated neighborhood to a truly mixed income neighborhood housing residents of varied ethnicities and income levels. Using an ethnographic approach, I interviewed residents, policy makers, agency staff, advocates, and housing developers; conducted archival research on planning documents, newspapers, blogs, neighborhood list-servs, and public hearing proceedings; and observed - both directly and as a participant – in public parks, commercial establishments, public hearings, community, tenant and organizational meetings, and at rallies and town halls. My findings suggest that the District of Columbia, neighborhood groups, housing advocates, and developers instituted some of the best practices in urban planning and housing policy, which led to a mixed income neighborhood with a focus on dense, mixed-use and multi-modal transit oriented development. However, in spite of – or perhaps because of – dramatic changes in the concentration of poverty, through the combination of the preservation of existing affordable housing and the addition of higher income new residents, low income residents’ sense of community, political power and access to amenities changed significantly. Moreover, the focus on place and physical amenities that has been a hallmark of large scale redevelopment has implicitly devalued less tangible elements of neighborhood life related to use-value, community cohesion, and culture. Further, the implied benefits of mixed income communities for low income households, combined with the narrative of urban decline and rebirth that echoes across American cities have combined to justify the social, political and physical displacement of existing residents. / text
4

The Right to Food and the Right to the City: An argument for ‘scaled up’ food activism in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside

Drabble, Jenna 25 March 2015 (has links)
As food insecurity increases among socio-economically marginalized populations, community based efforts to address these issues have received particular attention for their potential to promote justice in food systems. This thesis presents a case-study analysis of right to food (RTF) activism in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside (DTES), a community where decades of failed government policies and economic disinvestment have produced high levels of poverty as well as organized resistance and activism. I explored this localized movement through key stakeholder interviews (n=17) and 10 months of participation at a community-based organization. My findings suggest that local efforts to organize around RTF may have had some success in challenging the dominant discourse and practices associated with the entrenched charitable food model. However, these efforts are limited in their ability to ‘scale up’ this work to transform the systems that produce uneven urban food environments. I argue that the barriers to food access in the DTES are inextricably tied to broader historical contestations over urban space produced by processes of capitalist urbanization. Drawing on Lefebvre’s ‘right to the city,' I suggest how RTF activism in the DTES could benefit from linking more explicitly to the collective struggles facing wider efforts to reclaim the city.
5

The Process of Commoning in Suderbyn Ecovillage : Rural Lessons for a Multi-scalar Right to the City

Svensson, Henning January 2018 (has links)
Henri Lefebvre’s radical call for “the right to the city” as a step in his wider utopian project of societal transformation has attracted much academic interest in the 21st century. A central problematic for advancing this idea, however, is how to take the leap from experimental heterotopies to a new form of urban commons that could provide the foundation for this new society. This thesis draws from Lefebvre’s extensive writings as well as from five weeks of ethnographic fieldwork, including a focus group and five semi-structured interviews conducted at Suderbyn ecovillage to deliver a comparative discussion on the process of establishing a common social relation to place (and ultimately space) and how it relates to scale. The main conclusion is that the dominance of use-values in combination with a synthesis of the connection of elements such as work, leisure and learning plays a central role in the process of establishing a common social relation to place in Suderbyn and that this in turn is a crucial aspect of consideration for tackling the scalar problematic.
6

The Right to the City from a Local to a Global Perspective : The Case of Street Vendor and Marketer Organizations in Urban Areas in the Copperbelt, Zambia

Jongh, Lennert January 2013 (has links)
The aim of this thesis is to investigate the workings of multi-scalar networks that connect informal economy organizations that are active locally, nationally and internationally. The study adopts a „right to the city‟ framework wherein the relation between the local and the global is discussed. The main questions that were addressed in the research were (I) how do local, national and global networks among street vendorsand marketers and their organizations shape the resistances of street vendors andmarketers and (II) how do local, national and international networks amongorganizations that work for street vendors and marketers contribute to street vendors‟ and marketers‟ claims to the rights to the city. Qualitative interviews were conducted with street and market vendors operating from urban areas in the Zambian Copperbelt as well as with organizations dealing with market and street vendors in the samegeographical area. Results showed that networks operating on different geographical scales served the street and market vendors as well as their organizations different purposes. Findings are related to the relative importance of the global for the local as well as contemporary theories of democracy and citizenship.
7

Mobile Space / Det mobila rummet

Edling Helmers, Siri January 2014 (has links)
My project creates spaces for common use, reclaiming a little left-over piece of the city landscape. The mobile culture house unfolds and fragments in interaction with the places it encounters. It is flexible, multi-use and respectful of the surrounding environment. I have attempted to answer to questions concerning the development of the city of Stockholm in times of escalating urbanization and galloping housing shortage when unreflected densification risks to erase diversity, cause gentrification and reinforce segregation. I have investigated the existing flora of small, urban grass-root, resistance movements and I have added my own contribution to the set. / Mitt projekt skapar utrymmen för gemensamt bruk genom att återta en liten bit av stadslandskapet. Det mobila kulturhuset vecklar ut och fragmenterar sig i samspel med de platser som det möter. Det är flexibelt, multi-use och respektfullt mot den omgivande miljön. Jag har försökt att svara på frågor som behandlar utvecklingen av Stockholms stad en tid av ökande urbanisering och galopperande bostadsbrist när oreflekterad förtätning riskerar att radera mångfalden, orsaka gentrifiering och förstärka segregationen. Jag har undersökt den nuvarande floran av små, ​​urbana gräsrots-motståndsrörelser, och jag har lagt mitt eget bidrag till uppsättningen.
8

Aboriginal youth, hip hop, and the right to the city: a participatory action research project

Skinner, Emily 19 September 2012 (has links)
This thesis sets out to explore the extent to which health inequities experienced by Aboriginal youth living in Winnipeg are mediated by the urban environment. Between 2010 and 2011, Aboriginal youth associated with the GAPAYAC undertook a participatory action research process to create stories about the geography of health inequity, to share their ideas for positive change, and to support their social and political aspirations towards their right to a healthy city. The youth researchers (N=8) used participatory hip hop techniques involving visual art, photography, spoken word, music, and dance as tools to 'map' health inequities within and across the city. The results revealed several themes that speak to the youth researchers experiences of health inequity as they related to mobility, place, and exclusion. In turn, the youth researchers mobilized their knowledge through art and performances as vehicles for taking action against health inequity.
9

Aboriginal youth, hip hop, and the right to the city: a participatory action research project

Skinner, Emily 19 September 2012 (has links)
This thesis sets out to explore the extent to which health inequities experienced by Aboriginal youth living in Winnipeg are mediated by the urban environment. Between 2010 and 2011, Aboriginal youth associated with the GAPAYAC undertook a participatory action research process to create stories about the geography of health inequity, to share their ideas for positive change, and to support their social and political aspirations towards their right to a healthy city. The youth researchers (N=8) used participatory hip hop techniques involving visual art, photography, spoken word, music, and dance as tools to 'map' health inequities within and across the city. The results revealed several themes that speak to the youth researchers experiences of health inequity as they related to mobility, place, and exclusion. In turn, the youth researchers mobilized their knowledge through art and performances as vehicles for taking action against health inequity.
10

Gentrifiering : En trendkänslig klasskamp

Karström, Tobias, Stymne, William January 2014 (has links)
Syftet med denna uppsats är att identifiera hur diskursen om gentrifiering framställs i tidningsmedier, där Södermalm i Stockholm figurerar som ett idealtypiskt exempel på en plats som anses ha gentrifierats. Studien har utförts genom tillämpandet av kritisk diskursanalys via Faircloughs riktlinjer, samt ett teoretiskt ramverk bestående av sociologiska teorier angående urbanitet och social stigmatisering. Här tillämpas Georg Simmels och Pierre Bourdieus teorier som stadsliv, habitus och kulturellt kapital, Norbert Elias syn på etablerade och outsiders samt David Harveys formulering om rätten till staden. Analysen består av tio tidningsartiklar publicerade i tidningarna Aftonbladet, Expressen, Dagens nyheter, Metro, Mitt i Södermalm och Svenska Dagbladet. Resultatet indikerar att gentrifiering först och främst anses som en form av klassrelaterad urbaniseringsprocess, som tar form i utförsäljning av hyresbostäder, skapandet av en ny medelklass, och populärkulturella trender. Resultatet indikerar även att det inte finns någon homogen förståelse för huruvida gentrifiering är någonting negativt eller positivt i sig. Dock finns det en klar förståelse om att stadsdelens ekonomiska utveckling har förändrat platsen som sådan, vilket bemöts med blandad respons. / The purpose of this essay is to identify how the discourse about gentrification is produced in Swedish newspapers, where Södermalm in Stockholm is a typical example of a place that is considered to be gentrified. The study was conducted through critical discourse analysis, using Faircloughs guidelines and a theoretical framework consisting of sociological theories on urbanity and social stigmatization. The essay applies Georg Simmel’s and Pierre Bourdieu's theories on city life, habitus and cultural capital, Norbert Elias's view of established and outsiders and David Harvey's formulation of the right to the city. The analysis consists of ten newspaper articles published in the Swedish newspapers Aftonbladet, Expressen, Dagens Nyheter, Metro, Mitt i Södermalm, and Svenska Dagbladet. The results indicate that gentrification is seen as a class-related urbanization process which takes shape through sales of rental units, the creation of a new middle class and popular cultural trends. The results also indicate that there is no uniform understanding of whether gentrification is negative or positive. Nevertheless there is an understanding that the district's economic change has altered the site, which is met with mixed responses.

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