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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
21

Explorations of resilience in women who experience domestically violent relationships.

Naidoo, Devasham. January 2008 (has links)
<p>The thesis hopes to augment this focus by exploring the multitude of discourses women make in terms of oppression, resilience being one such possible response. It is proposed that the research may expand on existing literature, offering an alternative perspective as to why women often remain in abusive relationships. Furthermore, the rationale of the thesis is to contest the notion that women who remain in domestically violent relationships do so for underlying pathological reasons.</p>
22

Damaged children and broken spirits : an examination of attitudes of Anisin&#257b&#275k Elders to acts of violence among Anisin&#257b&#275k youth in saskatchewan

Cote, Helen 29 September 2008
This thesis arises out of a participant-observational study of narrative histories of people's experiences in Catholic residential schools in Saskatchewan. All the Elders interviewed are First Nations Anisin&#257b&#275<sup>l</sup> people, most of whom live on five reserves north-west of Yorkton. All are recognized Elders<sup>2</sup>. The Elders have the common experience of having had at least one youth (or a young relative between the ages of ten to twenty-five years old) in their immediate families commit one of these acts of violence: murder, manslaughter, infanticide, or suicide. The Elders also had the shared personal experiences of being in residential schools.<p> One research objective was to evaluate the influence of historical residential school experience upon subsequent attitudes to violence by youth in their family units. I formulated the study as an empirical test for a number of reasons: i) to examine a principal conclusion of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (1996) that documented the high rate of suicide among Aboriginal youth is a consequence of psycho-social dysfunction arising out of the residential school experience; ii) to review government policies of colonalization that led to personal abuse of Aboriginal youth in parochial residential schools, abuses that have contributed to lasting social problems for Aboriginal peoples; and iii) to study the healing movement. A Government policy lead to personal abuse that lead to a social problem.<p> The common theme that emerges out of the collective experiences of Elders is the common history of abuse suffered by Aboriginal students at parochial residential schools, the wholesale destruction of the Aboriginal family unit, and "social dysfunction" within the Aboriginal community caused by church and state for ideological and political objectives. My argument focuses on genocide and not justice issues, and it is framed by my own experiences as an Aboriginal woman who survived residential school.<p> <b><sup>1</sup> Anisin&#257b&#275 means a beautiful people who are Saulteaux speaking people living in Saskatchewan whose ancestors signed Treaty Four.<p> <sup>2</sup> All are recognized Elders in my mind. In my culture if you as a person, in this case myself, consider some person as an expert or as an Elder, who is to argue with me and say my opinion does not count. For example I chose a woman from my tribe and my clan to give me the correct spellings to the Saulteaux words I use in my thesis. In my culture you do not name yourself as an Elder, other people do that. Some Elders get widely known by many people, others are known as Elders in their immediate clans and tribes. Therefore in my thesis, they are Elders in my eyes because they have experiential wisdom.</b><p>
23

Damaged children and broken spirits : an examination of attitudes of Anisin&#257b&#275k Elders to acts of violence among Anisin&#257b&#275k youth in saskatchewan

Cote, Helen 29 September 2008 (has links)
This thesis arises out of a participant-observational study of narrative histories of people's experiences in Catholic residential schools in Saskatchewan. All the Elders interviewed are First Nations Anisin&#257b&#275<sup>l</sup> people, most of whom live on five reserves north-west of Yorkton. All are recognized Elders<sup>2</sup>. The Elders have the common experience of having had at least one youth (or a young relative between the ages of ten to twenty-five years old) in their immediate families commit one of these acts of violence: murder, manslaughter, infanticide, or suicide. The Elders also had the shared personal experiences of being in residential schools.<p> One research objective was to evaluate the influence of historical residential school experience upon subsequent attitudes to violence by youth in their family units. I formulated the study as an empirical test for a number of reasons: i) to examine a principal conclusion of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (1996) that documented the high rate of suicide among Aboriginal youth is a consequence of psycho-social dysfunction arising out of the residential school experience; ii) to review government policies of colonalization that led to personal abuse of Aboriginal youth in parochial residential schools, abuses that have contributed to lasting social problems for Aboriginal peoples; and iii) to study the healing movement. A Government policy lead to personal abuse that lead to a social problem.<p> The common theme that emerges out of the collective experiences of Elders is the common history of abuse suffered by Aboriginal students at parochial residential schools, the wholesale destruction of the Aboriginal family unit, and "social dysfunction" within the Aboriginal community caused by church and state for ideological and political objectives. My argument focuses on genocide and not justice issues, and it is framed by my own experiences as an Aboriginal woman who survived residential school.<p> <b><sup>1</sup> Anisin&#257b&#275 means a beautiful people who are Saulteaux speaking people living in Saskatchewan whose ancestors signed Treaty Four.<p> <sup>2</sup> All are recognized Elders in my mind. In my culture if you as a person, in this case myself, consider some person as an expert or as an Elder, who is to argue with me and say my opinion does not count. For example I chose a woman from my tribe and my clan to give me the correct spellings to the Saulteaux words I use in my thesis. In my culture you do not name yourself as an Elder, other people do that. Some Elders get widely known by many people, others are known as Elders in their immediate clans and tribes. Therefore in my thesis, they are Elders in my eyes because they have experiential wisdom.</b><p>
24

The affects and effects of an anti-oppression course emphasizing ethics on students /

Prasad, Ashwini. January 2004 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.I.S.)--Oregon State University, 2005. / Printout. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 145-149). Also available on the World Wide Web.
25

Why do the oppressed become the oppressors?

Sukhraj, Jacinta, January 1991 (has links)
Thesis (M.T.S.)--Catholic Theological Union at Chicago, 1991. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves [56]-58).
26

Explorations of resilience in women who experience domestically violent relationships.

Naidoo, Devasham. January 2008 (has links)
<p>The thesis hopes to augment this focus by exploring the multitude of discourses women make in terms of oppression, resilience being one such possible response. It is proposed that the research may expand on existing literature, offering an alternative perspective as to why women often remain in abusive relationships. Furthermore, the rationale of the thesis is to contest the notion that women who remain in domestically violent relationships do so for underlying pathological reasons.</p>
27

Mitos y estereotipos, instrumentos de opresión en la obra de Rosario Castellanos

Savoie, Marie January 1976 (has links)
No description available.
28

Explorations of resilience in women who experience domestically violent relationships

Naidoo, Devasham January 2008 (has links)
Magister Psychologiae - MPsych / The thesis hopes to augment this focus by exploring the multitude of discourses women make in terms of oppression, resilience being one such possible response. It is proposed that the research may expand on existing literature, offering an alternative perspective as to why women often remain in abusive relationships. Furthermore, the rationale of the thesis is to contest the notion that women who remain in domestically violent relationships do so for underlying pathological reasons. / South Africa
29

Hegemonic Masculinity and Transphobia

Chung, Marilyn 01 May 2017 (has links)
Transphobia research has focused on predictors and correlations of prejudice toward transgender people. Consistently, male participants have higher transphobic attitudes compared to female participants in various studies. Further, males are overrepresented in crimes against transgender people. However, these studies were correlational and causation cannot be determined. Masculinity researchers outside of psychology have discussed maintenance of masculine privilege as a motivator for oppressive beliefs and actions. Thus, the goal of this study was to provide an experimental study of causes for increased transphobic attitudes in men, based on sociological and gender studies’ research on hegemonic masculinity. To test this, participants were given false feedback that masculinity score was either “feminine” (the experimental group) or “similar to their age group” (the control group). Results of the present study indicated participants in the experimental group reported nearly statistically significantly greater transphobia than those in the control group, p = .047. Although the findings were not significant, further research is needed to validate these findings. The study provides implications for future research on causes of transphobic attitudes and behaviors through sociological frameworks of power and privilege in the context of gender.
30

The Marginalization of Zitkala-Ša and Wendy Rose

Barajas, Dina Kristine January 2010 (has links)
The purpose of this research is to show how the Native American activists Zitkala-Ša and Wendy Rose, two women from different eras, were marginalized and how these experiences affected their personal and professional lives and activism. It is important to examine why and how these women were marginalized because of the scarce amount of research on the topic and on Native American women in general. Zitkala-Ša and Wendy Rose are examples of Native American women activists whose lives and activism have been affected by marginalization, and who have faced adversity, pushed against the margins and demanded justice for their people. In order to conduct the research, primary and secondary works by and about these subjects were examined. The limitation of this study is that the literatures examined are writings by or about the authors. Interviews were not conducted; therefore the primary and secondary works were the main sources of analysis.

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