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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Genealogies and personality characteristics of the workmen in the Deir el-Medina community during the Ramesside Period

Davies, Benedict George 1996 (has links)
No description available.
2

Physical activity and sedentary behaviour across the spectrum of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Orme, Mark W. 2017 (has links)
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are generally more sedentary and less physically active than healthy adults; putting them at increased risk of hospitalisation and death. For patients with mild-moderate COPD, physical activity appears to be reduced compared with apparently healthy adults but differences in time spent sedentary are less well established. Additionally, there is a need for a greater understanding of the correlates of behaviour in mild-moderate patients with much of the existing literature focusing on more severe or mixed stage patient samples and with many studies lacking objective behavioural monitoring, not adjusting for confounders and a paucity of data on correlates of sedentary time. Despite having mild-moderate airflow obstruction, these patients also report a range of symptom burdens with some individuals reporting severe symptoms. Subsequently, these patients represent a sub-set of individuals who may require lifestyle interventions. Therefore, factors associated with patients reporting more severe symptoms need to be identified to help understand how this phenomenon may manifest and be intervened upon. For patients with more advanced COPD who are admitted to hospital for an acute exacerbation behavioural intervention focussing on less intense movement may be a more suitable approach for reducing the risk of readmissions than more intense physical activity or exercise. To date no studies have specifically targeted reductions in sedentary behaviour in COPD. In addition, wearable self-monitoring technology may facilitate the provision of such interventions, removing important participation barriers such as travel and cost, but this has not been sufficiently examined in COPD. This thesis investigated: (i) objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time and the correlates of these behaviours for mild-moderate COPD patients and apparently healthy adults (Study One); (ii) factors associated with self-reported symptom severity and exacerbation history in mild-moderate COPD patients (Study Two) and (iii) the feasibility and acceptability of a home-based sedentary behaviour intervention using wearable self-monitoring technology for COPD patients following an acute exacerbation (Study Three). Methods: Study One: COPD patients were recruited from general practitioners and apparently healthy adults from community advertisements. Objectively measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), light activity and sedentary time for 109 mild-moderate COPD patients and 135 apparently healthy adults were obtained by wrist-worn accelerometry. Patients with at least four valid days (≥10 waking hours) out of a possible seven were included in analysis. A range of demographic, social, symptom-based, general health and physical factors were examined in relation to physical activity and sedentary time using correlations and linear regressions controlling for confounders (age, gender, smoking status, employment status and accelerometer waking wear time). Study Two: In 107 patients recruited from general practitioners, symptoms were assessed using the COPD Assessment Test (CAT) and Modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) questionnaires. Twelve-month exacerbation history was self-reported. Exercise capacity was assessed via incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) and self-reported usual walking speed. Physical activity and sedentary time were obtained from a wrist-worn accelerometer. Study Three: Patients were randomised in-hospital into a usual care (Control), Education or Education + Feedback group with the intervention lasting 14 days following discharge. The intervention groups received information about reducing prolonged sitting. The Education + Feedback group also received real-time feedback on their sitting time, number of stand-ups and step count at home through an inclinometer linked to a smart device app. The inclinometer also provided vibration prompts to encourage movement when the wearer had been sedentary for too long. Feasibility of recruitment (e.g. uptake and retention) and intervention delivery (e.g. fidelity) were assessed. Acceptability of the intervention technology (e.g. wear compliance, app usage and response to vibration prompts) was also examined. Results: Study One: COPD patients were more sedentary (592±90 versus 514±93 minutes per day, p < 0.05) and accrued less MVPA (12±18 versus 33±32 minutes per day, p < 0.05) than apparently healthy adults. For COPD patients, self-reported dyspnea and percentage body fat were independent correlates of sedentary time and light activity with exercise capacity (incremental shuttle walk test) an independent correlate of MVPA. For apparently healthy adults, percentage body fat and exercise capacity were independent correlates of sedentary time and light activity. Percentage body fat was an independent correlate of MVPA. Study Two: ISWT (B=-0.016±0.005, partial R2=0.117, p=0.004) and years living with COPD (B=0.319±0.122, R2=0.071, p=0.011) were independently associated with CAT score. ISWT (B=-0.002±0.001, R2=0.123, p < 0.001) and vector magnitude counts per minute (VMCPM) (B=0.0001±0.0000, R2=0.050, p=0.011) were independently associated with mMRC grade. MVPA was independently associated with previous exacerbations (B=-0.034±0.012, R2=0.081, p=0.005). Patients reporting a CAT score of > 20 or an mMRC score of ≥2 had lower VMCPM, were more sedentary and took part in less light activity than patients reporting a CAT score of 0-10 or mMRC of 0, respectively. Patients reporting ≥2 exacerbations took part in less MVPA than patients reporting zero exacerbations. Study Three: Study uptake was 31.5% providing a final sample of 33 COPD patients. Retention of patients at two-week follow-up was 51.5% (n=17). Reasons for drop-out were mostly related to being unable to cope with their COPD. Patients wore the inclinometer for 11.8±2.3 days (and charged it 8.4±3.9 times) with at least one vibration prompt occurring on 9.0±3.4 days over the 14 day study period. Overall, 325 vibration prompts occurred with patients responding 106 times (32.6%). 40.6% of responses occurred within 5 minutes of the prompt with patients spending 1.4±0.8 minutes standing and 0.4±0.3 minutes walking, taking 21.2±11.0 steps. Discussion: Study One: COPD patients were less active and more sedentary than apparently healthy adults; however, factors predicting behaviour were similar between groups. Correlates differed between sedentary time, light activity and MVPA for both groups. Interventions to boost physical activity levels and reduce sedentary time should be offered to patients with mild-moderate COPD, particularly those reporting more severe breathlessness. Study Two: Worse exercise capacity, low levels of physical activity and more time spent sedentary are some of the factors associated with patients of the same severity of airflow limitation reporting differing symptom severities. These patients may benefit from both lifestyle and exercise interventions. Study Three: Recruitment and retention rates suggest a trial targeting sedentary behaviour in hospitalised COPD patients is feasible. A revised intervention, building on the successful components of the present feasibility study is justified. Conclusion: The findings from this thesis have contributed a greater understanding of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in COPD and can inform the development of tailored physical activity and sedentary behaviour interventions for patients across the grades of COPD severity.
3

'The foremost of believers' : the Egyptians in the Qur'an, Islamic exegesis, and extra-canonical texts

Calabria, Michael 2014 (has links)
From the perspective of the Hebrew Bible the Egyptians represented the quintessential 'other' to the Israelites - lascivious, idolatrous, tyrannical, hostile and murderous. The biblical characterization of the Egyptians may be explained by the historical context in which early Israel emerged, a context in which Egypt represented a political, military and cultural threat to Israel's survival and distinctiveness, and in which the Israelites came to regard themselves as a covenanted people, in a unique and exclusive relationship with their God. This biblical perspective was inherited to some extent by the early Christian community, which according to the apostle Paul has been grafted into Israel's salvation history, and thus continued to associate the Egyptians with idolatry and base morality. The Islamic assessment of the ancient Egyptians, as presented particularly by the Qur'an, extra-canonical works and commentaries, and how it compares to biblical and extra-biblical views, is the subject of this study. Drawing on distinctions of covenanted and missionary identities as described in Anthony Smith's Chosen Peoples (2003), this thesis hypothesizes that the Qur'an and Islamic tradition with their pronounced missionary thrust present a rather different image of the 'other', particularly the Egyptians, given the historical context in which Islam emerged. This study presents a unique examination of the Egyptians in the Qur'an and extra-canonical texts as related through their encounters with the prophets Ibrahim, Yusuf, Musa and 'Isa. It combines a detailed exegetical and intertextual study of revelant Qur'anic verses with an analysis of extra-canonical texts such as the qisas al-anbiya' and traditions such as are found in al-Tabari's al-Ta'rikh al-rusul wa'l-muluk. Moreover, this thesis addresses historical, Egyptological and archaeological issues, and how the Qur'anic portrayals of the Egyptians in particular reflect the concerns and values of the early ummah, a community of believers which not only struggled to survive the hostilities of the Quraysh, but which sought to bring them and others to faith in the God of Ibrahim.
4

Les chaouabtis royaux et le développement de l’au-delà égyptien : la royauté et la religion des particuliers The royal shabtis and the development of the egyptian afterlife : the kingship and the private’s religion

Alfieri Gama-Rolland, Cintia 5 March 2016 (has links)
Les statuettes funéraires égyptiennes dites chaouabtis ou, à partir de la XXIe dynastie, ouchabtis, comptent parmi les artefacts les plus couramment laissés par les Égyptiens anciens. On considère généralement qu’elles servent à conserver magiquement l’intégrité corporelle du défunt, ou à se substituer à lui lors des travaux agricoles obligatoires dans l’au-delà, ce qui explique la figuration d’outils. Aussi un certain nombre de questions sont posées par l’étude des exemplaires royaux. Pourquoi un pharaon, exempté de tout travail agricole de son vivant, aurait-il besoin de se faire représenter avec des outils, ou avoir des serviteurs travaillant pour accomplir ses corvées dans l’au-delà ? Si, comme l’affirme la théorie de la « démocratisation », la religion égyptienne se diffuse de la royauté à l'élite, puis au peuple de manière générale, comment expliquer que l’usage des chaouabtis semble se développer en sens inverse ? Cette recherche regroupe pour la première fois les chaouabtis royaux du Nouvel Empire dans un catalogue raisonné, sans se limiter au simple recensement, en insérant ces artefacts dans leur contexte religieux, social et politique, avec pour objectif de mieux appréhender les mouvements internes à la société égyptienne. The Egyptian funerary statuettes, known as shabtis, or as from the XXIst dynasty, ushabtis, are among the most commonly artefacts left by ancient Egyptians. It is generally considered that they served to magically conserve the bodies of the deceased, or to replace them on mandatory agricultural chores in the afterlife, which would explain the presence of tools. A certain amount of questions are also raised while studying the royal figurines. Why does a pharaoh, exempt from all agricultural tasks while living, would need the representation of tools, or of servants working to accomplish their chores, in the afterlife? If, as stated by the theory of « democratization », the Egyptian religion diffuses itself from the royalty to the elite, and then to the people as a whole, how does one explain that the use of shabtis seems to develop itself the other way around? This research gathers for the first time the royal shabtis from the New Kingdom in a catalogue, without limiting itself to simply listing the articles, but putting the artefacts in their religious, social and political contexts, aiming to better apprehend the movements inside the Egyptian society.
5

Götter - Herrscher - Amtsinhaber Beispiele zu Genealogie als Denkform im Alten Ägypten

Bickel, Susanne, Münch, Hans-Hubertus 20 December 2013 (has links) (PDF)
Im Verlauf der altägyptischen Geschichte war Genealogie ein wichtiges Mittel, um die Vergangenheit zu strukturieren und zu bewerten. Königliche Genealogien dienten als Instrument der Zeitmessung und ermöglichten es, Könige als Nachfahren der Götter darzustellen. Durch ihren selektiven und normativen Charakter waren königliche Genealogien dazu geeignet, die kollektive Erinnerung und das historische Wissen zu konstruieren. Dies fand vor allem im Tempelbereich und bei öffentlichen Feiern der Ramessiden-Zeit statt. Vergleichbare Herrscherfolgen wurden in den privaten Grabbereich übernommen, um das Fortleben des Verstorbenen im Jenseits sicherzustellen. Längere private Genealogien sind allerdings erst seit dem 1. Jahrtausend v. Chr. belegt. Königliche wie private Genealogien dienten dem Zweck der Legitimation. Throughout the Ancient Egyptian history, genealogy was an important tool for structuring and validating the past. Royal genealogies were established as a means of measuring time and relating kingship to the gods as predecessors. In their selective and normative form, royal genealogies were means of constructing the collective memory and historical knowledge. These constructions were primarily mobilised within temple decoration and public feasts of the Ramesside period. Similar groupings of kings were also taken over and adapted in private tombs as means of sustaining the deceased’s further existence in the afterlife. Longer private genealogies are, however, attested only from the 1st millennium onwards. Both royal and private genealogies served as arguments of legitimation.
6

The man and the creation : an inquiry into the modern fascination of king Tutankhamun

Doerr, Sarah A. 2008 (has links)
This item is only available in print in the UCF Libraries. If this is your Honors Thesis, you can help us make it available online for use by researchers around the world by following the instructions on the distribution consent form at http://library.ucf.edu/Systems/DigitalInitiatives/DigitalCollections/InternetDistributionConsentAgreementForm.pdf You may also contact the project coordinator, Kerri Bottorff, at kerri.bottorff@ucf.edu for more information. Bachelors Arts and Humanities Humanities
7

The concept of law and justice in ancient Egypt, with specific reference to "The tale of the eloquent peasant"

Van Blerk, Nicolaas Johannes 2006 (has links)
This thesis discusses the interaction between the concepts of ”justice” (ma‛at) and ”law” (hpw) in ancient Egypt. Ma‛at, one of the earliest abstract terms in human speech, was a central principle and, although no codex of Egyptian law has been found, there is abundant evidence of written law, designed to realise ma‛at on earth. The king, as the highest legal authority, was the nexus between ma‛at and the law. Egyptologists have few sources of knowledge about law and justice in ancient Egypt because the ancient Egyptians used commonplace language in legal documents and they only had a few imprecise technical terms relating to law. For Egyptology to advance, therefore, we need to reappraise its sources. The Tale of the Eloquent Peasant has a strong legal background and should be treated as an additional source of information about how law and justice were perceived and carried out in ancient Egypt. Classics and Modern European Languages M.A. (Ancient Languages and Cultures)
8

The concept of law and justice in ancient Egypt, with specific reference to "The tale of the eloquent peasant"

Van Blerk, Nicolaas Johannes 2006 (has links)
This thesis discusses the interaction between the concepts of ”justice” (ma‛at) and ”law” (hpw) in ancient Egypt. Ma‛at, one of the earliest abstract terms in human speech, was a central principle and, although no codex of Egyptian law has been found, there is abundant evidence of written law, designed to realise ma‛at on earth. The king, as the highest legal authority, was the nexus between ma‛at and the law. Egyptologists have few sources of knowledge about law and justice in ancient Egypt because the ancient Egyptians used commonplace language in legal documents and they only had a few imprecise technical terms relating to law. For Egyptology to advance, therefore, we need to reappraise its sources. The Tale of the Eloquent Peasant has a strong legal background and should be treated as an additional source of information about how law and justice were perceived and carried out in ancient Egypt. Classics and Modern European Languages M.A. (Ancient Languages and Cultures)
9

Götter - Herrscher - Amtsinhaber

Bickel, Susanne, Münch, Hans-Hubertus 20 December 2013 (has links) (PDF)
Im Verlauf der altägyptischen Geschichte war Genealogie ein wichtiges Mittel, um die Vergangenheit zu strukturieren und zu bewerten. Königliche Genealogien dienten als Instrument der Zeitmessung und ermöglichten es, Könige als Nachfahren der Götter darzustellen. Durch ihren selektiven und normativen Charakter waren königliche Genealogien dazu geeignet, die kollektive Erinnerung und das historische Wissen zu konstruieren. Dies fand vor allem im Tempelbereich und bei öffentlichen Feiern der Ramessiden-Zeit statt. Vergleichbare Herrscherfolgen wurden in den privaten Grabbereich übernommen, um das Fortleben des Verstorbenen im Jenseits sicherzustellen. Längere private Genealogien sind allerdings erst seit dem 1. Jahrtausend v. Chr. belegt. Königliche wie private Genealogien dienten dem Zweck der Legitimation. Throughout the Ancient Egyptian history, genealogy was an important tool for structuring and validating the past. Royal genealogies were established as a means of measuring time and relating kingship to the gods as predecessors. In their selective and normative form, royal genealogies were means of constructing the collective memory and historical knowledge. These constructions were primarily mobilised within temple decoration and public feasts of the Ramesside period. Similar groupings of kings were also taken over and adapted in private tombs as means of sustaining the deceased’s further existence in the afterlife. Longer private genealogies are, however, attested only from the 1st millennium onwards. Both royal and private genealogies served as arguments of legitimation.
10

Reading the exodus tradition from a Zimbabwean perspective

Rugwiji, Temba 2008 (has links)
The exodus tradition was passed on for posterity among the Jewish descendants about God who delivered their ancestors from bondage in Egypt, who divided the Red Sea waters and provided them with manna in the desert. The exodus tradition motivated them in many problematic situations about "God of their fathers" who delivered them. The modern post-biblical world has drawn some motivation from the exodus liberation motif, namely: Latin America, USA, South Africa, Rhodesia and Zimbabwe, amongst others. The topic: Reading the Exodus Tradition from a Zimbabwean Perspective is necessitated by the Zimbabwean experience of oppression. The function of the exodus tradition during colonialism in Rhodesia is discussed because it forms the nucleus from which Zimbabwe was born. Recently, the Zimbabwean people have been subjected to unjust treatments by the Zimbabwean regime. The function of the exodus tradition in the Zimbabwean situation is explored in chapters five and six, respectively. Biblical and Ancient studies M.A. (Biblical Studies)

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