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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

REFINTO : an ontology-based requirements engineering framework for business-IT alignment in financial services

Umoh, Emem Koffi January 2016 (has links)
Business-IT alignment has been a top research topic for three decades now and consistently ranks high on CIO priorities and concerns. In spite of its seeming advantages, sustainable business-IT alignment remains elusive in practice. This can be attributed to the language and knowledge gaps which impede mutual understanding between business and IT stakeholders. It can also be attributed to the limitations imposed by approaching alignment solely from a strategic perspective. This thesis argues for an ontology-based framework that bridges the language and knowledge gaps through closer interaction between business and IT stakeholders throughout the software development and project management lifecycles, especially at the requirements engineering stage. Attempts at achieving sustainable business-IT alignment predominantly focus on strategic alignment and have not been successful for various reasons. Firstly, driving down alignment initiatives to the operational and tactical levels is challenging. Secondly, it is difficult to operationalize the metrics used for evaluating alignment maturity at strategic levels. These limitations are less pronounced at the functional levels of an organization. It is at these levels that business strategies are executed and interaction between business and IT personnel is most frequent. The interaction between business and IT stakeholders in the execution of IT projects presents an opportunity that can be leveraged to drive alignment maturity. The proposed framework is discussed in terms of its underpinning hypotheses, workflows, tool design and implementation, its use with a third party framework and tool. Antecedents to operational and tactical alignment such as quality, reuse, communication, learning, and shared understanding, are proposed as a practical means of achieving sustainable alignment maturity. The framework is applied to real world, business-critical projects in a top global financial services organization and validated using descriptive statistical analysis and structural equation modelling techniques. Contributions made through the study are highlighted. This includes the Alignment Forces Model which unifies the proposed framework and its support tool within software development and project management lifecycles. The Alignment Forces model and how it can be applied in practice is presented. Results of the quantitative data analyses indicate support for the arguments for the framework towards improving business-IT alignment, however with some limitations. Results also indicate support for the hypotheses for the antecedents to sustainable alignment maturity at lower organizational levels put forward. Finally, suggestions on furthering the study, addressing its limitations, and refining the framework and tool are articulated.
2

Adopting Free/Libre/Open Source Software Practices, Techniques and Methods for Industrial Use

Garrigós, Janina, Minoves, Pau January 2009 (has links)
Today’s software companies face the challenges of highly distributed development projects and constant changing requirements. To be competitive, the software time to market has to be reduced as much as possible while keeping the expected quality. Development methodologies try to address this challenges by introducing new practices, techniques and methods for communication, requirements management, quality assurance, etc. This thesis proposes the adoption of relevant Free/Libre/Open Source Software practices to improve industrial developments. Many FLOSS projects have proven very successful, producing high quality products with steady frequent releases. The selection of the FLOSS best practices that would benefit industrial developments, and its adaptation for a corporate environment is the aim of this study. To achieve this goal, a framework to compare FLOSS and industrial development methodologies has been created and executed. Three successful FLOSS projects where selected as study targets, as well as two Ericsson’s projects. The framework served to identify FLOSS methodology strengths and compare them with the Ericsson projects. Analysing the significant differences resulting from this comparison, FLOSS best practices were tailored to fit industrial development environments. The final results of the thesis are six adoption opportunities that aim to improve software quality and overall development productivity while increasing practitioners’ motivation and commitment.
3

Evolving Software Development Methodologies: The Search for Accounting Clarity

Igou, Amy 01 December 2014 (has links)
For many years, most IT departments used the same software development methodology called waterfall. This methodology outlines distinct phases for project completion; each phase needing to be completed prior to the start of the next. The primary accounting standard for allocating costs for software development is written in the language of waterfall. Costs are either capitalized or expensed depending on the type of activity that was performed. IT departments have been moving toward a new group of software development methodologies called agile. These methodologies do not follow the phases of waterfall. This makes the current accounting standard for software development difficult to interpret and determine the appropriate transaction. This further hinders IT organizations attempts to better quantify business value of software projects. To examine this issue, a new construct called accounting clarity is introduced in this research. Accounting clarity is an agreement between IT and accounting regarding the treatment of software development costs. This study shows that it is essential for both IT and accounting to work together to determine a solution. The accounting clarity construct is developed from the “ilities” of software quality models and the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) Level 3 key process area (KPA) of intergroup coordination. Intergroup coordination provides the concepts for accounting clarity as the two groups must coordinate to determine the appropriate accounting treatment. The “ilities” are characteristics that should be followed and measured throughout a software development project to ensure long term maintainability of software. This study proposes that accounting clarity should be one of the "ilities" in the software quality model. A portion of the study of accounting clarity examines the relationship between accounting clarity and project control, proposing a positive relationship between the two variables. Then the study examines factors that help to increase accounting clarity. These factors were derived from teamwork and coordination literature. To test the hypothesized relationships, a survey methodology was used. Individuals working on agile software development projects were participants in the survey. This study contributes to both the IT and accounting literature. The research provides a framework to examine other contexts in which the current accounting standards are unclear. As changes happen more frequently in business, this is more likely to occur on a frequent basis. The study has practical implication for software development as it highlights the importance of understanding the accounting implications prior to the project and continuously throughout the lifespan of the software. Adding accounting clarity to the “ilities” of software quality helps software development teams include this in project plans with any software development methodology.
4

The agile methods : an analytical comparison of five agile methods and an investigation of their target environment : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Information Sciences in Information Systems at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

Strode, Diane Elizabeth Unknown Date (has links)
This study defines the systems development methodologies named agile methods and investigates the environmental conditions where agile methods are most suitable. A definition of agile methods was developed using an analytical comparativeframework to investigate five of the earliest published agile methods; Dynamic SystemsDevelopment Method, Extreme Programming, Scrum, Adaptive Software Development,and Crystal Methods. The framework decomposed each method into its componentparts; philosophy, models, techniques, tools, scope, outputs, practice, and the extent towhich the method may be adapted to a situation. Based on this analysis and a literaturereview, a theoretical model of the target environment for agile methods was developed.This theoretical model is a proposed set of organisation, people, project, technology,and domain factors that relate to the successful use of an agile method.A mixed method research methodology was used. A qualitative design, consisting ofpositivist case studies, was used to test the theoretical model. Data was gathered fromnine software development projects, both agile and non-agile, using questionnaires andinterviews of project leaders. Then cross-case analysis was carried out on each projectfactor in the theoretical model. The relationship between environmental factors andagile method usage was investigated using non-parametric quantitative data analysis.This led to a revised model of the target environment for agile methods. The empiricaldata showed that specific organisational culture factors correlate with effective use of anagile method. These include the organisational characteristics of feedback and learning,teamwork, empowerment of people, collaboration, leadership, loyalty, and a resultsorientedculture that values entrepreneurship, innovation and risk taking.This research is significant for method users, those carrying out empirical research into agile methods, and those carrying out studies of systems development methodologies.
5

Business process management in an intrapreneurial software organisation / Ulrike Janke

Janke, Ulrike January 2006 (has links)
Business process management (BPM) is a philosophical approach to organisation-wide management in which the focus is on the processes through which it operates, and in particular the streamlining and optimising of these processes, for which software solutions may be used. CTexT is an intrapreneurial software organisation that has been experiencing problems with software development due to a lack of formal processes relating to customer support, versioning, configuration, quality, risk and project management. The objective of the study is to determine whether the implementation of an electronic BPM system can effectively solve CTexT's development problems and thereby improve its overall software development capacity. More specifically, the focus is on i) the effect of the resulting standardisation on creativity and innovation, and ii) implementation matters, such as the type of processes that can be subjected to an electronic system, and how CTexT can overcome the time and cost constraints of such a system. The study investigates these questions by means of a literature investigation in combination with interviews with knowledgeable respondents from other innovative and software organisations. Interviews with six employees from CTexT determine the relevance of these findings and highlight critical areas for process improvement. Since BPM systems improve organisational efficiencies and are generally employed in larger corporate contexts marked by transactional and repetitive activities where they enforce administrative rules, the conclusion is drawn that a BPM system will not be suitable for an intrapreneurial organisation, and that it is likely to cause more disruption to the creative environment than improve its operations. It is further shown that although a BPM system is theoretically applicable to software development, it generally does not seem to be applied practically in the industry, and the suitability of this process as manageable through a BPM system is seriously questioned. Instead, the research points to improvement through the application of software development methodologies and a holistic approach towards BPM. The investigation at CTexT confirms that its development problems relate to flawed methodologies and that remedies should therefore focus on improving its methodologies and controlling certain aspects of the software development life cycle by means of suitable software tools. / Thesis (M.B.A.)--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2007
6

Business process management in an intrapreneurial software organisation / Ulrike Janke

Janke, Ulrike January 2006 (has links)
Business process management (BPM) is a philosophical approach to organisation-wide management in which the focus is on the processes through which it operates, and in particular the streamlining and optimising of these processes, for which software solutions may be used. CTexT is an intrapreneurial software organisation that has been experiencing problems with software development due to a lack of formal processes relating to customer support, versioning, configuration, quality, risk and project management. The objective of the study is to determine whether the implementation of an electronic BPM system can effectively solve CTexT's development problems and thereby improve its overall software development capacity. More specifically, the focus is on i) the effect of the resulting standardisation on creativity and innovation, and ii) implementation matters, such as the type of processes that can be subjected to an electronic system, and how CTexT can overcome the time and cost constraints of such a system. The study investigates these questions by means of a literature investigation in combination with interviews with knowledgeable respondents from other innovative and software organisations. Interviews with six employees from CTexT determine the relevance of these findings and highlight critical areas for process improvement. Since BPM systems improve organisational efficiencies and are generally employed in larger corporate contexts marked by transactional and repetitive activities where they enforce administrative rules, the conclusion is drawn that a BPM system will not be suitable for an intrapreneurial organisation, and that it is likely to cause more disruption to the creative environment than improve its operations. It is further shown that although a BPM system is theoretically applicable to software development, it generally does not seem to be applied practically in the industry, and the suitability of this process as manageable through a BPM system is seriously questioned. Instead, the research points to improvement through the application of software development methodologies and a holistic approach towards BPM. The investigation at CTexT confirms that its development problems relate to flawed methodologies and that remedies should therefore focus on improving its methodologies and controlling certain aspects of the software development life cycle by means of suitable software tools. / Thesis (M.B.A.)--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2007
7

Which agile methodology suits you? By applying the results on a multi-disciplinary project in a small company

Saadatmand, Fatemeh January 2013 (has links)
Choosing the Software Development Methodology is the very first step of any project; thus,has been a hot topic among, both, practitioners and academic people. After using plandrivensoftware development methodologies software development researchers came up withthe idea of agile software development methodologies as a masterpiece. Although, failurestories of some teams brought about fading the idea that agile methodologies are thebest recipe for any kind of development project. Considering the lack of studies in helpingpractitioners to select the most appropriate agile software methodology, this study aims atprovide the software development manager with a thorough knowledge of agile methodologiesand the criteria that should be considered, while selecting one of them. A case study is used asan empirical support. / Program: Magisterutbildning i informatik
8

Business process management in an intrapreneurial software organisation / by Ulrike Janke

Janke, Ulrike January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (M.B.A.)--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2007.
9

UMA METODOLOGIA BASEADA EM ONTOLOGIAS PARA A ENGENHARIA DE APLICAÇÕES MULTIAGENTE / A METHODOLOGY BASED ON ONTOLOGIAS FOR THE ENGINEERING OF APPLICATIONS MULTI - AGENT

Lindoso, Alisson Neres 10 March 2006 (has links)
Made available in DSpace on 2016-08-17T14:52:48Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 alisson lindoso2.pdf: 6722921 bytes, checksum: 2f55fa8a7f109106c015f0307cb7582c (MD5) Previous issue date: 2006-03-10 / The increasing demand of software applications constructed conciliating productivity, low cost and high quality, even in complex and changeable domains, turns necessary the elaboration of techniques and methodologies focusing on development paradigms more suitable for approaching these conflicting features, like the multiagent one. On the other hand, the sotware reuse process promotes the creation of new applications employing reusable software artifacts previously developed. This work introduces MAAEM, an ontology-driven methodology for analysis, design and implementation of multi-agent applications through the reuse of models and components that represent the requirements of a family of applications in a domain as well as the corresponding agent-oriented solutions to these ones. ONTORMAS, an ontology whose instantiation is useful for modeling and representing specific applications developed with MAAEM methodology, is also presented. Two case studies elaborated in order to evaluate the methodology and ontology are also described, exploring the cases with and without reuse, respectively, in the touristic and juridical domains. / A crescente demanda por aplicações de software cuja construção concilie produtividade, baixo custo e alta qualidade, mesmo em domínios complexos e mutáveis, torna necessária a elaboração de técnicas e metodologias que foquem paradigmas de desenvolvimento mais adequados para abordar aquelas características conflitantes, tal como o paradigma multiagente. Por outro lado, o processo de reutilização de software permite promover a criação de novas aplicações empregando artefatos de software reutilizáveis previamente desenvolvidos. Esse trabalho introduz a MAAEM, uma metodologia baseada em ontologias para a análise, o projeto e a implementação de aplicações multiagente através do reuso de modelos e componentes que representam os requisitos de uma família de aplicações em um domínio, assim como as correspondentes soluções orientadas a agentes para tais requisitos. É também apresentada a ONTORMAS, uma ontologia cuja instanciação é útil para modelar e representar aplicações específicas desenvolvidas com a metodologia MAAEM. São descritos ainda dois estudos de caso elaborados no sentido de avaliar a metodologia e a ontologia, explorando os casos com e sem reuso, respectivamente, nos domínios turístico e jurídico.

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